Surf Maui Guest Post: My 1962 Giants Memorabilia Collection

by
Surf Maui

Over the years I have assembled an eclectic mix of Giants memorabilia–some of it stuff that I saved over more than 60 years of being a Giants fan–and which I’m sure that many of you have or at least had at least in recent years–and some unique stuff that I bought. Most of it was sitting in boxes, and until I moved and Greek Giant helped me sort it out and put it on display I didn’t realize just how much stuff there was. So at Greek Giants urging, over the next few weeks in the off season I’ll try to share some of the more unique pieces and related memories with Together We’re Giants

Nineteen sixty-two was the year that I really became a Giants fan. And in the process I learned a bunch of critical lessons, not only about baseball, but more important about life in general. I had been a Giants fan before that year, but that season cemented my lifetime allegiance. I have more than my share of shortcomings but loyalty–and in this case loyalty to the Giants is certainly not one of them.

I grew up in Albany, New York during the hey day of New York baseball and in particular the Yankees era of the 1950’s. As a child I actually thought that the World Series was played exclusively between the Yankees and the Dodgers. My father, and almost all of my schoolmates were Yankees fans, and the Yankees won both the AL pennant and the World Series with astonishing regularity. So, naturally like any rebellious kid – as a precursor to the protest movements of the 1960’s–I started rooting for the Giants and a guy named Willie Mays. How much of becoming a Giants was just to annoy my father, or because I liked Willie Mays or some other reason, who knows?

At that time there was an ongoing raging debate among New York and Brooklyn fans of all loyalties about who was the best centerfielder in New York (and by extension all of baseball) Mays, Mickey Mantle or Brooklyn’s Duke Snider. Actually Snider (who most may not remember ended his career with the Giants in San Francisco in 1964) was really not appropriately in the Mays-Mantle conversation, but Brooklyn needed to have someone in the discussion, and Duke did end up with more than 400 home runs and more than 2,000 hits. Certainly a very good player (for a Dodger) but no Mays or even Mantle.

I distinctly recall listening to the 1954 World Series on the radio, and hearing of the exploits of Dusty Rhodes, who, unbeknownst to me at the time was not a great star, but got extremely hot at the right time and thereby became a Giants post season legend. He was the Cody Ross, Travis Ishikawa, or Marco Scutaro of his time.

By 1958, of course the Giants moved to San Francisco, and I became classmates with Gary Shaye–who for whatever reason had become a Giants fan–probably also to annoy all the other kids who were mostly all Yankee fans, though there were a few loser Dodger fans. Just this year I reconnected with Gary and together with Greek Giant attended one of the Yankee-Giant games this summer in New York. Back then, however, Gary had written to then Giants executive and later NL Chub Feeney who responded with a Giants Press Guide giving all kinds of facts, pictures, schedules, and what passed for statistics in those days. It was exotic to root for an out of market team, and we could still listen to Giants games on the radio through the static on 50,000 watt clear channel stations when they played St. Louis (Jack Buck), Pittsburgh (Bob Prince), Philadelphia, Chicago and Cincinnati, and later the Mets. Once in a while the Giants would be on TV on the Game of the Week broadcast by Dizzy Dean and Pee Wee Reese. But the radio was how I followed the final weeks of the classic 1962 pennant race.

From the time that the Giants moved to San Francisco they were loaded with hitting–think Mays, Cepeda, McCovey (1959) Felipe Alou, and others lesser known today such as Harvey Kuenn (later the manager of the Brewers Harvey’s Wallbangers fame) They never had the pitching to match the Dodgers Koufax and Drysdale–in those days half of a four man rotation– even after Marichal arrived on the scene. In 1962, however, the pitching fell into place. Future Hall of Famer Gaylord Perry was a rookie that year, and was not much of a factor. But Jack Sanford– an otherwise journeyman pitcher had a magical season winning 24 games and losing only 7. Billy Pierce, longtime White Sox pitcher who helped them win the 1959 World Series and was a former AL pitcher of the year (forerunner of the Cy Young) was 16-6 and wound up winning one game in the playoffs and saving the finale). Marichal was 18-11. Billy “Digger” Odell was 19-14. Stu Miller, and Don Larsen (who, in competition with Indians pitcher Don Mossi had the world’s biggest ears–don’t ask me how I know this, but I can still picture his baseball card) of 1956 World Series perfect game fame were relief pitchers on that team.

Although by popular lore the 1951 Giants comeback from 13 games behind the Dodgers in mid August was the greatest comeback in baseball history, I would argue that the Giants comeback to win the 1962 pennant was more impressive. With 6 games left in the season the Giants were 3 games behind the Dodgers. They picked up a game heading into the final weekend of the season, and then the Dodgers lost all three at St. Louis culminating in a 1-0 finale loss. That opened the door later that day to a 2-1 win by the Giants on a late Mays home run to finish the season in a tie and set up a three game playoff. The Giants won the first game 8-0 at Candlestick behind Billy Pierce and two Mays home runs. As a preview of the 2016 playoffs, the Giants blew a 5-0 lead in game two of the playoffs setting up the finale at Chavez Latrine,

As in the deciding game of 1951 playoff, ultimately decided by “The Shot Heard Round the World,” the Giants trailed 4-2 going to the ninth inning. A four run ninth inning rally started with a Matty Alou pinch hit single, a Kueen groundout, walks to McCovey and Felipe Alou, and an infield RBI single to Mays (who as a rookie was on deck at the time of the Thompson home run). Cepeda followed with a sacrifice fly to tie the game and sent Alou to third. Catcher Ed Bailey was intentionally walked and then the wheels fell off the Dodgers with a Davenport walk forcing in the go ahead run, and a Dodger error on Pagan grounder. Pierce–just like Madison Bumgarner 52 years later– despite pitching a complete game shutout two days earlier saved the game with a perfect bottom of the ninth.

I was watching the game in black and white at Gary Shaye’s house. Fortunately because the game was on the west coast it was after school. After the way we had come back to catch the Dodgers at the end of the regular season, I can honestly say that we never gave up hope. We just knew that the Giants would find a way to win yet again. And they did. As a result of the 1962 season and the Playoffs that year, to this day, every single season and every single game until the magic number is reached or the last out is made, I still believe the Giants will somehow find away to win. Sometimes it works out– the amazing run of elimination victories in 2010, 2012, and 2014– and sometimes not–1962 and 2002 World Series and 2016 meltdown. But as the song says I “Don’t (Ever) Stop Believin.”

Fittingly, the final out of the 1962 playoffs was a routine fly ball to Mays. I vividly remember it, and I can still see it in my minds eye, just as I can the see the black and white image of McCovey’ liner to Bobby Richardson to end the 1962 World Series. I’ll admit, though that with each passing year that line drive, which would have scored the tying and winning runs somehow becomes harder hit and less catchable.

surfmauiscorecard

All of which brings me to my 1962 World Series Game 5 scorecard, pictured here. My father was an accountant, and one of his clients had Yankees tickets, so we got his seats for game 5. The series was tied 2-2 and in those days all of the games were in the afternoon. We drove the three hours from Albany to New York City intending to return after the game. We had great seats about 10 rows behind the third base dugout and it was a tremendous thrill for me to see Willie Mays warming up, that close. Unfortunately it was pouring out, and after some time the game was postponed till the next day. So we went to stay overnight at my Grandmother’s studio apartment, conveniently located a short distance from Yankee Stadium, in hopes of seeing the game the next day.

Missing my second day of school, the weather was perfect the following day and the rivalry between my father, about 60,000 other Yankees fans and me was set. It was a matchup between Jack Sanford, who had won game two with a shutout against his Game 5 opponent Ralph Terry. Because of the travel day to the west coast and what turned out be several days of uncharacteristic rain in San Francisco, they would match up again in Game 7.

As you can see, this scorecard had the lineups filled in but is not scored. I do remember having a filled in scorecard at one time, so the only explanation I can come up with is that my surviving scorecard was from the rained out game the day before, and my “scored” card has been lost over the years. I distinctly remember the Giants taking the lead on a home run by Jose Pagan, standing and cheering by myself in the midst of Yankee fans. When Tom Tresh hit a 3 run homer in the eighth to win it for the Yankees, the guy in a business suit sitting next to me really gave me the business, as my father was smiling silently over the Yankees win.

I hated losing to the Yankees. Still do to this day. The Yankees went to the ninth inning in Game 7 with a 1-0 lead, the only run in the game scoring on a double play grounder. Having seen the Giants come back to tie for the pennant and then come back from a two run deficit in the ninth by scoring four to win the playoffs, Gary Shaye and I (again watching in black and white) were absolutely convinced that that Giants had another miracle finish left. I remember the ninth inning–at least the hits– as if it were yesterday. Matty Alou, as he had in the ninth inning of the playoffs led off with a single, this time a bunt. Two outs later Willie Mays–who had been on deck for Bobby Thompson’s home run– came to the plate. We just knew that he was going to get that run home. When Mays lashed a double to right field, with two outs we absolutely were sure that Alou would score, but third base coach, former Giant player and later well regarded manager Whitey Lockman (the Roberto Kelly of his day) held him at third. To this day I believe that he would have scored. And then it was over, when McCovey lined out.

surfmauiprogramThat 1962 series started a long wait to get to the World Series again. Despite tremendous talent –five Hall of Famers Mays, McCovey, Cepeda, Marichal and Perry, and new additions like Bobby Bonds we always came up short. A series of terrible trades (such as Cepeda for pitcher Ray Sadecki) didn’t help. It would be 27 more years before the Giants made the World Series again, and of course 48 more years till they finally won it.

Despite the long wait, that special 1962 season taught me to never gave up on the Giants, for a season or a game until the last out has been made. That patience has been rewarded by the last six years–the Golden Era of San Francisco Giants baseball–which has truly embodied all that is special about the Giants franchise and being a Giants fan.

Last winter when I was laid up recovering from foot surgery I set about assembling a collection of the baseball cards from all of the players on that 1962 team. They are pictured here. That team will always be special to me.

The disappointment of losing the lead in Game 4 to the Cubs is still fresh, but as with every year, now for more than 50 years I’m looking forward to next season. Less than 100 days till Spring Training. As the late Commissioner Bart Giamatti wrote

“[Baseball] breaks your heart. It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the Spring, when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face the fall all alone.”

Fall is almost over and the 2017 pennant race will start in the Spring–just three months away. As has been the case since 1962, I’m absolutely convinced that the Giant will find a way to win it all.

  • Breckeroni says: “Stunning”

  • “To this day I believe that he would have scored. And then it was over, when McCovey lined out.”

    Maris was a superb defensive Right-fielder. What really hurt was Maris made a superb play on grass that was wet and an on-the-mark relay throw …

    • channelclemente

      Maris only ended up a Yankee because of the A’s owners collusion with the Yankees.

  • Michael Scott

    Marcel who??

  • Merritt Riley now 47 years old was a Yankee bat boy. He loved the Bombers but also idolized George Brett and had THE bat in his hand during the rhubarb. Later Tim McClelland had the bat and Gaylord Perry sneaked up behind and grabbed it …

    The NPR audio is priceless http://snapjudgment.org/bat-boy-and-pine-tar-game

    The written story is here:

    http://deadspin.com/bat-boy-has-a-helluva-story-about-george-bretts-pine-ta-719385102

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887324867904578594154270594078

  • 610nm

    Being converted to a Giants fan by Willie Mays’ baseball style is my story, too. I think there are a lot of us needing to thank Willie for our lifelong passion. Oddly, Mom handed me a 1962 Yankees/Giants series program just a few weeks ago. My copy is just blank inside, whereas Surf Maui’s is filled out, and he actually was in the stadium for game 5. Wow! Thanks so much for preparing this blog post.

    • totalfan62

      My dad introduced me to the Giants, and of course Willie Mays was very quickly my favorite player. As I began to look closer at the team’s we played and their players, I quickly realized that Willie Mays as the best player in baseball…and he’s on MY team! As an excitable pre-teenager, that was really cool

  • Like Surf Maui said Duke was never a threat to the who is better question. Mays turned out to be but it doesn’t bother me to say that had Mantle not stepped into an exposed sprinkler head and wrenched his knee he would have been equal to Willie or …. Mantles times out of the LF/RH batters box was Bo Jackson-esque. Mays ran the bases better but Mantle was quicker in the beginning. Mays made hard to fathom catches but his arm was only above average. The raw power from both sides of Mantle was spooky. Later in his career if Mantle swung and missed at a ball – it was a difficult watch – as he grimaced in pain. Mays did stuff that was unheard of like stay at first base when he hit a double so they would not IBB McCovey …
    Regardless, Mays is the answer to that question that all NY and Brooklyn fans had …

    • channelclemente

      He not only ‘wrenched’ his knee, he tore an ACL while doing so. Can you imagine anyone today playing his entire career essentially with a torn ACL. He and Mays would have been an even more spectacular pair had that not happened. He might have given Mays a run for his money.

  • Foothills must have a Excel Spread sheet for the Doyers who must cut debt to comply with MLB rules

    • Scout Finch Baseball

      I can tell you their 25 man payroll was 270+ mil in 2015, 250 mil last year. They may target 230 mil this year. After this season, Carl Crawford, Andre ethier and Alex Guerrero come off the books and that is about 45 mil worth of obligation. They would be on course for 200-210 mil by 2018, the target to meet debt reduction.

      • 22’sSweetSwing

        until they sign Harper

        • Scout Finch Baseball

          Yankees?

          • 22’sSweetSwing

            You are probably right, smell-LA seems to want to do it without a lot of help from outside the organization.

  • The Raiders are seemingly holding off the Panthers @ 35-32 with under a minute to go….

    • Scout Finch Baseball

      How bout them Raiders? This Plunkett kid out of Stanford is alright.

    • Lunch_Box

      I hate both teams: I had Greg Olsen and Amari Cooper on my fantasy team, and they both didn’t do squat.

      Maybe I gotta take a break from playing next year. I’m already stressed when I watch Giants games.

  • Keep’n It Real

    Very nice!

  • Time for a Sunday night gatheround for us here on TWG to wish Matthew a speedy recovery. He was high up on a ladder hanging lights when ladder fell. Either send well wishes, smoke a doobie or say a prayer. MRI earlier today.
    🙁

    • Bapah

      What’s the Dx?

      • No updates until I get a text

        • totalfan62

          Thoughts and prayers, Brother Matthew.

    • channelclemente

      That’s just awful. I already miss him. Somebody tickle his feet.

    • Scout Finch Baseball

      Aye yi yi. Matthew should not have been doing that with a bad back. Hopefully nothing broken. Get well soon.

    • Keep’n It Real

      Crap :-/

    • Efrain

      Oh man! Matthew wishing a speedy recovery!

    • DrLefty

      Sorry to hear that. Thanks for letting us know.

    • crawnik

      Here’s wishing you a speedy recovery Matthew.

    • Moooooooooose

      Aw, geez Matthew! Hope you’re going to be okay. Keep us posted Clutch.

    • 12xu

      Hope you’re feeling better, Mr. Matthew. Wishing you a speedy recovery.

    • Sgbssfg

      That is scary, hope you are feeling better.

    • steve k

      thanks for the news, and updates as they become available, clutch. i’ll pick option D) all of the above, well wishes, and prayers, as well as the doob a little later, which will have mateo’s name on it…

    • BALDHEADSLIKK

      Matty what are you doing up there on that damn ladder? Get well soon kid!

      • Exactly what mom would have said!

    • dgg

      That is scary. I hope Matthew will be okay.

    • Keep’n It Real

      Get well, Matthew! I was shuddering when I read this, because I’ve been up many ladders in the past few weeks putting up Christmas Lights. I’m lucky I’m in a 1-story, but high ceilings makes it an adventure.

    • Noce

      Get well Matthew and take it slowly.

    • 22’sSweetSwing

      Yikes! Get well soon Mathew.

  • totalfan62

    Great post, Surf! That was a wonderful read. My timeline is very close to yours, and you revived precious memories from the distant past. Thank you, sir.

  • DrLefty

    So Jon Heyman opines that the debt-ridden, cost-cutting Dodgers won’t be able to afford Cespedes, so the most likely landing spots are the Giants or the Nats.

    I’ll believe Cespedes is going to be a Giant when I see him sitting under my Christmas tree below the MadBum ornament.

    Comment from a Dodger fan regarding the “debt-ridden” story in the LA Times today: “So they’re really going to waste Kershaw’s prime?” That’s an interesting perspective. Kershaw is going into his age-29 season, and there are a lot of miles on him. Who knows about that back problem he had, too. Maybe more importantly, he has an opt-out after 2018. If the Dodgers keep surrounding him with Brandon McCarthys and the like, he may decide that Chicago or Boston or Texas looks pretty good in a couple years.

    That said, Kershaw’s been to the playoffs six times in eight years and the Dodgers have won the last four NL West titles, so have they really “wasted” his prime years? They had the highest payroll in baseball for a couple of those, too.

    • crawnik

      Did you see to where they might go after Harper or Machado in 2018? This is probably one reason why they want to cut debt…for now.

    • 610nm

      Madison will turn 28 next August 1. Also a lot of pitches thrown, but as far as I know, no back problems. Knock on wood.

    • Noce

      Cespedes under the tree? Not an image I want to think about. That’s funny.

  • totalfan62

    The Chiefs/Broncos game last night was one of the best I’ve seen in quite some time. Close, hard-fought defensive battle between two very good teams, fighting to stay only one game behind the Raiders. Chiefs tie it up on the last play of the game, getting a two-point conversion to force OT. They play the entire 5th qtr, KC wins on a FG that hits the goalpost and ricochets through. Kept me up until midnight here in the east, but…great game!

    • Moooooooooose

      And it came THAT close to hitting the OTHER crossbar!!

  • steve k
  • The Oracle

    While not quite on the level of Mays or Mantle, I’d say Duke Snider was a great player. At his very best, the Hall of Famer had a five year stretch where he hit .311, had an OPS of 1.025, and averaged 42 HRs a season.

    • Keep’n It Real

      It must’ve been pretty neat in those NY days, when they had Willie, Mickey, and the Duke.

    • totalfan62

      Absolutely belonged in the discussion.

    • Edwin Donald “Duke” Snider aka “The Silver Fox” and “The Duke of Flatbush” was a great ball player. Coming in third with those two is nothing to sneeze at.

  • dgg

    Perhaps someone has already talked about this article. It’s by Patrick Saunders, Rockies beat reporter for the Denver Post. He talks about the pros and cons and possibility of Mark Melancon signing with the Rockies. Saunders states in the last line of his article that he doubts this will happen. But Saunders makes a strong argument in his analysis for how Melancon would be an effective pitcher in Rocky Mountain altitude:

    “Of course, all of the speculation about Melancon assumes that he would be successful in Colorado. Would he? I think so. He’s a control pitcher with a low-90s cut fastball that I think would work at altitude. He also throws a low-80s knuckle curve and the occasional low 90s four-seam fastballs.”

    The combination of home-town pull and his probable success pitching at altitude makes me wonder if Melancon will choose the Rockies over the Giants. (The Dodgers may not be able to afford Melancon because as Lefty noted below, the Dodgers are not in compliance with MLB debt-service rules.)

    http://www.denverpost.com/2016/11/25/saunders-pros-cons-reality-rockies-signing-mark-melancon/

    • Keep’n It Real

      I know there’s probably a strong home town pull, but as the guys on MLB Radio said (not necessarily about Melancon)…”The vast majority of guys are in this business to win a ring. The money is nice, but everyone wants that ring.” Not going to happen in CO, so we’ll see where Melancon’s head is at. The Giants ought to get Affeldt to give Mark a call. Good reference point for both teams.

    • Scout Finch Baseball

      I outlined it a bit below, but don’t expect the Dodgers to go Frugal McDougal this winter. They can still spend, although not excessively as before, and still be in line to meet the agreements for debt servicing. I expect a payroll up to 230 million, down from 250 million last year. They have 170 million allocated to 11-15 players on a putative 25 man roster, but would still be able to afford closer, Justin Turner, trade for help at 2B or LF, and rotation help or additonal bullpen help.

  • Keep’n It Real

    This coming Sunday, the snooze-fest will (hopefully) end. Bleacher Report still has Melancon choosing our team.

    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2678591-predictions-for-the-2016-mlb-winter-meetings-1-week-out

    • Anti-Lasorda

      Yeah, from your screen to God’s ears…..

  • totalfan62

    Remember when we debated whether Alex Smith or Colin Kaepernick would achieve a better rep as an NFL QB? Yeah, we did that. Smith showed his mettle in last night’s game.

    • Keep’n It Real

      Said the very same thing to my wife last night, when they tied the score via that TD and the 2-point conversion. “I guess that Alex guy really does suck.”

      The Broncos QB made some nice plays too.

    • Spot on. The media and talking football heads coined the phrase game manager. Barf. The kid went 25-1 in High School and was a academic/athletic star at Utah leading them to victories in the 2003 Liberty Bowl and the 2005 Fiesta Bowl. He earned a bachelor’s degree in economics in two years and began work on a master’s degree in the field before being drafted. I love the athletic endeavors of Kap but the Harbaugh regime gaffed when Kap was given the position due to Smith’s then concussion. The Bears game lulled people to sleep and from there the Kap at QB aficionados went off the rails because Kap passed for 243 yards and two touchdowns in his first career start as the 49ers whipped the Chicago Bears 32-7 on Monday night in a highly touted NFC showdown that hardly lived up to the hype.

      Two opposites can be equally true:
      *Smith never should have lost his job the way he did and traded;
      *Kap is a very gifted athlete.

      • Michael Scott

        The 2012 Playoff game against the Saints was one of the best ever.The last 5 minutes were incredible. The last drive:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHB3xAZpW-k

      • Efrain

        I agree that Smith is very good, and if memory serves correct the Harbaugh’s braintrust thought they had gone as far as they could with Smith and his strong points and felt CK’s athlecism was the key missing ingredient.

        No matter how nice Smith is or how accomplished he is as a QB, the bottom line is the Niners organization erred in picking Smith over Rogers. Because Rogers is and has been in the conversation if the best QB’s in the league. Smith has never and will never be part of that conversation. That does not mean he is a bad qb, but let’s be realistic.

        • 22’sSweetSwing

          AS 2-3 in sf/KC playoff games
          CK 5-2 in SF playoff games

          And people hold up AS as a very good QB? maybe my standards are too high but neither guy seems worth the respect they get on Bay Area airwaves or blogs.

          • Efrain

            Agree but many here get bent out of shape if Alex is criticized. I never was a fan, but as far as the league goes he is better than over 50% of the choices out there.

            CK can be very good as yesterday displayed but he can’t be a one man team. Very unfair to grade him on the current team since he has a patchwork OL and not much around him in the skill positions.

          • Keep’n It Real

            It’s not exactly fair to pin playoff losses on the QBs.

            2 of Alex’s losses, for example, were not the result of him losing the game. The 49ers lost to the Giants in the NFC Championship Game because of fumbled punts and playing with receivers that were their #5 and a guy that was activated from the practice squad (cut by another team). He was phenomenal in one playoff loss for KC.

        • Mike McCarthy (how ironic) told Mike Nolan and company to draft Smith over Rodgers in 2005. Dennis Erickson went 2-14 in 2004.

          Alex Smith would have audibled vs the Ravens on the Goal line. Kap has always been tenative to audible. Yesterday, when they could not afford to use a timeout – Kap called one and when he came over to Chip Kelly on the sidelines – Kelly said “what’s up” – Kap’s back was to the camera – but Kelly told him to “just go with it” (implying we can’t use a Time Out right there)

    • Michael Scott

      I’ve been a fan of Alex since he destroyed Pitt in the 2005 Fiesta Bowl.He might be one of the best examples of why character counts- in sports and in “real life”. It may not have been intentional but the 49’ers couldn’t have traded him to a better spot than KC and Andy Reid.
      BTW, CK has been getting better every week, he was brilliant yesterday.
      Last nights game? Wow. It seemed like first team to 10 would win, and then both QB’s turned it on. Semion was dynamic, Alex was Alex- Alex won. Thank you, Gary Kubiak. And then a routine FG wins it.
      With home games with the Raiders and the Broncos , they can control their own destiny.

    • Anti-Lasorda

      Some of us on here still maintain the franchise would still be in Super Bowls if they would have kept Smith, and given him his job back when they were supposed to.

  • Keep’n It Real

    I’m thinking the way the WBC seemed to affect that last group of USA MLBers that played, I could see this going away. Can’t host it, if home team isn’t playing/winning.

    http://www.cbssports.com/mlb/news/this-world-baseball-classic-could-reportedly-be-the-last-one/

  • At first I thought the Canucks were only diabolical about hockey but they have gone joyful for the Ottawa “Redblacks” winning the Grey Cup.

    Ottawa wins Grey Cup, beating Calgary 39-33 in OT November 28, 2016, 05:00 AM The Associated Press
    TORONTO — FORTY ONE YEAR OLD (WTF) – Henry Burris threw an 18-yard touchdown pass to Ernest Jackson in overtime and the Ottawa Redblacks won the Grey Cup on Sunday night, beating the Calgary Stampeders 39-33. The third-year Redblacks won their first Canadian Football League title, and gave Ottawa its 10th championship. The Rough Riders won the last of their seven titles in 1976, and the Senators won in 1925 and 1926. Calgary was favored by double digits after finishing the regular season 15-2-1. The Redblacks, at 8-9-1, were the first team to finish first in a division with a losing record.

    The 41-year-old Burris won the game MVP award for the second time.

    He also was the Grey Cup MVP with the Stampeders in 2008 in their victory over Montreal at Olympic Stadium. He was Jeff Garcia’s backup with the 1998 champion Stampeders. The Stampeders rallied from 20 points down and, after a successful onside kick, forced overtime on Rene Paredes’ field goal with 10 seconds left in regulation. Bo Levi Mitchell threw three interceptions.

  • Matthew Update: “​..one more day bed ridden then to OR for a procedure tomorrow AM that basically burns away some nerves that a​re preventing me from moving….”

    • Scout Finch Baseball

      sounds like he exacerbated the back problem? – the ladder was the straw that “broke” the camel’s back? Dunno, but thanks for update, can hope/imagine for the best that this procedure unlocks the problem.

    • 610nm

      Thanks for the update. We are all hoping this turns out well. Please text back our best wishes (from everyone here).

    • Surf Maui

      Hang in there Mathew. We’re all thinking of you.

      • Noce

        I read your article on the 62 Giants. That is my first memory of being a Giants fan and heading to San Francisco to wait for it…….shop with my mother. My dad and grandmother got tickets to the 7th game of the series and no ticket for 6 year old. I have never been disappointed about not going. But in a strange way its part of our family lore.

    • So sorry to hear about this. As with everyone else, best wishes to Mathew.

    • Keep’n It Real

      Get well, Matthew!!

  • channelclemente
  • Keep’n It Real
    • Anti-Lasorda

      I agree

  • The Oracle

    There’s a neighborhood is San Jose that includes Giant Wy., Candlestick Wy., Davenport Dr. and McCovey Ln. I think there’s a slight chance that the builder might also have been a fan of the the 60s era Giants.

    • That’s pretty funny.

    • LOOK at all the streets with Giants names, like you said.

      http://tinyurl.com/hnsqr77

    • Surf Maui

      Also (Bob) Feller Ave and (Dave) Fleming Ave. One also for Manny Machado–Machado Lane, as well as Clayton Road for Royce Clayton. Decker (Steve) Way too. And dont forget (Bill) Buckner Drive. (Billy) Loes Way was also a pitcher from the 1960’s. Gerard way is a tribute to Buster Posey. (Darrell) Porter Lane as well as (Sparky) Anderson Road and (Mike) Piazza Way. They’re all there too!

  • Scout Finch Baseball
    • Keep’n It Real

      The big question is this something they’ll strike for? If you are an established player that went through the regular draft…are you going to lose paychecks for an international teenager that is eligible to make significantly more money than you did via the regular draft? I know some of the $$$ goes to the people that trained the international teenager, but that’s going to be a big pill to swallow for many MLB players.